Glimpse of Post-Suffrage Future…

“I thought too, of the admirable smoke and drink and the deep armchairs and the pleasant carpets: of the urbanity, the geniality, the dignity which are the offspring of luxury and privacy and space.” — Woolf, page 23

I stumbled on these great cartoons from 1890s-1920s illustrating the horrors of women gaining the right to vote and was reminded of what we discussed in class, of women sitting around and smoking cigars. It’s funny that Woolf disliked the Suffrage Movement. While she blames the movement for making it difficult for women to write because of the self-consciousness that it aroused in men and women’s minds (pg 98 – 100), the cartoon is clearly illustrating that because of the Suffrage Movement, women might have the luxury to smoke their cigars (and write).

The above cartoon posits that gaining the same rights as men had, would result in women sinking — in imitation — to the moral character of men. Why Not Go the Limit?, by Harry Grant Dart, was published March 18th, 1908, in Puck magazine.

The above cartoon posits that gaining the same rights as men had, would result in women sinking — in imitation — to the moral character of men. Why Not Go the Limit?, by Harry Grant Dart, was published March 18th, 1908, in Puck magazine.

More cartoons!

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3 thoughts on “Glimpse of Post-Suffrage Future…

  1. Thanks a ton for posting this! This is so cool. I love how the women were drawn slouching, with spittoons, and ignoring their children. They even switched the little boys and the little girls hat, so you definitely know that this cartoon is about women becoming men and men becoming women (oh no!). I’m really curious about why there’s a snail in a bell jar though in the bottom right hand corner. In my google adventures to try and find out what that’s commentary on I found some more interesting images of people’s visions of what might happen if woman got the right to vote. Here’s a link to a website that has a view more: http://superitch.com/?p=24940

      • I didn’t even notice the hats were switched! Perhaps the snail in the jar represents another facet of the masculine world that women in the cartoon have co-opted. I believe that observation of the natural world was pretty popular then?

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